PROCESS BASED. Informalism art movement

From this Artist I am thinking to make 3D shapes from the marks of the informal art , From that dark time , I am going to do some 3D shape and i will add light to that marks that are coming from suffering,anger, fustration, I want to think that we are going from a dense time to a lighter time, is a constant changing a constant moving on to a new era, I will add colour to that dark time, color to that marks.

I will let the material and colour lead the process also the intuition and the knowledge.

Intuition has to sit on the shoulders of the knowledge, That’s why I will keep studying history of Art and keep my art practice on going.

Manuel Millares.

Manuel Millares (1926-1972), Spanish painter born in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. his stay in Lanzarote during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) makes contact with the nature, which influence their work. At first, surrealism who exercises great influence on him.

After delving into the idiosyncrasies canaria as themes of his works, goes to investigate the surfaces and textures matter. From there draw their sacking, which combines wood and sand. In 1955 makes its perforations. Participates in the creation of the El Paso group, which have a decisive influence on the spread of Spanish informality or expressive abstraction. The trip by the Sahara in 1969, whose atmosphere will affect their conception of painting, resulting in a predominance of white sand in particular. This phase is followed by another entitled Antropofaunas and Neardentalios series consists of metamorphosed beings and turned into fantastic.

Thousands creates pictorial surfaces, volumes almost sculptural, they provoke in the viewer an intense emotional reaction. His work, in the purest informality.

In the work of Millares, Tapies, burry, and Afro Bassaldella. there is a lot of mark making, shapes, and different materials, this marks can be transform into 3D forms as starting point for a series of sculptures .

Tapies. Catalan painter.

In 1948, Tàpies helped co-found the first Post-War Movement in Spain known as Dau al Set which was connected to the Surrealist and Dadaist Movements. The main leader and founder of Dau al Set was the poet Joan Brossa. The movement also had a publication of the same name, Dau al Set. Tàpies started as a surrealist painter, his early works were influenced by Paul Klee and Joan Miró; but soon become an informal artist, working in a style known as pintura matèrica, in which non artistic materials are incorporated into the paintings.

Burry.

Alberto Burri was born on 12 March 1915 born to Carolina Torreggiani, Burri attended at the University of Perugia, the Annibale Mariotti high school, where he studied art, art history and medicine, enrolled in the faculty of medicine Burri specialized in tropical medicine and decided to work in Africa. With an precocious voluntary experience in the Italo-Ethiopian War, Burri was then recalled to military service on 12 October 1940, two days after Italy’s entrance into World War II, and sent to Libya as a combat medic. On 8 May 1943 the unit he was part of was captured by the British in Tunisia and was later turned over to the Americans and transferred to Hereford, Texas in a prisoner-of-war camp housing around 3000 Italian officers.

Prevented from practicing his medical profession, Burri had the opportunity of choosing a leisure activity using the limited amount of materials available in the camp he took on the activity of painting, at the age of almost 30 and without any kind of academic reference.

Meanwhile, the tragic death of his younger brother Vittorio on the Russian front in 1943 had a strong impact on him.

Shutting himself off from the rest of the world, and depicting figurative subjects on thick chromatic marks, he progressively realized the desire of abandoning the medical profession, in favor of painting.

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